About us: We own the Wild Birds Unlimited nature shop in East Lansing, Michigan,
a store that provides a wide variety of supplies to help you enjoy the birdwatching hobby.

This blog was created to answer frequently asked questions & to share nature stories and photographs.
To contribute, email me at bloubird@gmail.com.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Large blackbirds at feeder

The Common Grackle is a large black bird with yellow eyes and iridescent purple and bronze head feathers. When naturalists first came to explore North America it was difficult to determine to which genus grackles belonged. In between the size of a crow and starling, the common name, grackle, came from gracula, which is Latin for the Jackdaw or small crow.

When they migrate back to Michigan from their winter homes in central and southern United States they are hungry! They are resourceful foragers. Common Grackles thrive on bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, spiders, crustaceans, mollusks, fish, frogs, salamanders, mice, and other birds like sparrows around farms, fields and large lawns. They sometimes follow plows to catch bugs that are exposed, pick leeches off the legs of turtles, steal worms from American Robins, or saw open acorns with the hard keel on the inside of the upper beak.

Unfortunately there are slim pickings in the early spring which means very hungry grackles attack feeders for a variety of seeds, nuts and suets to sustain them until they can switch their diet over to something more substantial. If you are overwhelmed with grackles you can switch to seeds they don't like (safflower and nyjer) or switch your feeder over to something with smaller perches. Upside down suet feeders also stop starlings and blackbirds from easy access. Otherwise enjoy the loud and exciting show up close until they move off when the weather turns warm.

Related Articles:
   - Bird of the Week: Common Grackles http://bit.ly/OzgUjw
   - How to keep grackles away: http://bit.ly/Q1q0GI
   - Why is the blackbird associated with evil and ill omens? http://bit.ly/OzhBtb
   - When black birds fly south http://bit.ly/Q1qDAk
   - Bird Basics: How are birds classified? http://bit.ly/Q1reSr

No comments: