About us: We own the Wild Birds Unlimited nature shop in East Lansing, Michigan,
a store that provides a wide variety of supplies to help you enjoy the birdwatching hobby.

This blog was created to answer frequently asked questions & to share nature stories and photographs.
To contribute, email me at bloubird@gmail.com.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

What has the wings of an owl, the belly of a penguin, and the nose of a kingfisher

Biomimicry design is when people address critical sustainability issues with nature-inspired solutions. Japan’s Shinkansen (bullet train) doesn’t look like your typical train. It has a long and pointed nose like a kingfisher to reduce the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. The rigging that holds the train from above, uses serrated edges and curvature similar to owl wing feathers to reduce sound. And the penguins smooth belly inspired the the trains design for lower wind resistance. Engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three these species of birds.Watch the video explanation: https://youtu.be/iMtXqTmfta0

The study of wild birds’ has also been used to form many survival techniques integral to the military. This Veterans Day you might also find it interesting that to know that:
  1. Birds taught the military about camouflage - The development of camouflage was the result of studying birds and copying how they camouflaged themselves. An American artist and zoologist, Abbott Thayer published a book in 1909 called Concealing Coloration in the Animal Kingdom. This book focused a lot on birds and was widely read by military leaders in an attempt to understand how to camouflage military equipment and troops.
  2. Bird’s eye view gives military advantage – Man followed the birds in to the air. Since the middle of the First World War air warfare has revolutionized military conflict. Airborne supremacy is now a key element to success on the battlefield.
  3. Birds’ migratory V flight pattern adopted by military - A flock of geese can fly 70 percent farther by adopting the V shape rather than flying in isolation. The V formation also gives each bird an unobstructed field of vision, allowing flock members to see each other and communicate while in flight. Fighter pilots often use this formation for the same reason.
  4. Birds’ sentry system serves as an example to protect military members – Many bird species like crows and blue jays use a sentry system to protect members of a group and improve the chances of a good meal. Like birds warn companions of any danger with a distinctive "watchman's song", soldiers keep in regular radio contact with their colleagues to assure them all is well.
Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor all those who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank living veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served have sacrificed and done their duty.

We Honor you and Thank You for your service. 

Related Articles:
Patriotic Red, White and Bluebird http://goo.gl/OQrUY 

National Birds http://bit.ly/tCORyh  
War Pigeon Remembered http://t.co/5yiXSNS
Why is the Dove a Symbol of Peace? http://t.co/Br4EnlB
War Birds http://t.co/t7WJp99

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