About us: We own the Wild Birds Unlimited nature shop in East Lansing, Michigan,
a store that provides a wide variety of supplies to help you enjoy the birdwatching hobby.

This blog was created to answer frequently asked questions & to share nature stories and photographs.
To contribute, email me at bloubird@gmail.com.

Sunday, March 11, 2018

What sandhill cranes feed on

What do Sandhill Cranes eat?

Sandhill Cranes are mainly herbivorous, but eat various types of food, depending on availability. They often root around for seeds and variously berries, small mammals, insects, snails, reptiles, and amphibians, in shallow wetlands. During migration, cranes may eat cultivated foods such as corn, wheat, cottonseed, and sorghum.

Sandhill Cranes are very social birds that mate for life. On migration, their flocks number into the hundreds and are composed of mated pairs and close family members. While migrating, they communicate constantly with one another. Interestingly, males and females often sing duets as they fly.

It is always a special treat to find a flock of sandhill cranes on the ground. Look for them during migration late or early in the day in large fields or open, shallow wetlands. Only then can you appreciate their size and beauty. Sandhills are a tall, long legged, long necked gray bird with a bright red crown. From wingtip to wingtip their outstretched wings can measure up to 7 feet.

In Michigan, sandhills nest in solitary nests on the ground near or over shallow water in marshes and bogs. They nest by heaping plant debris into a low mound. Two eggs are laid; the young follow the parents soon after hatching, fly in about 70 days, and stay with the parents for nearly a year.

Their numbers were much reduced by habitat loss and shooting in the early part of this century but have grown in recent decades. A two year survey funded by the Nongame Wildlife Fund confirmed 805 breeding pair statewide. Most breeding pairs in the Lower Peninsula were found in a six county area near Jackson and Ann Arbor. Highest concentrations in the Upper Peninsula occurred in the eastern counties. 

Related Articles:
- Whooping Crane Migration http://goo.gl/avz5lG
- Photo Share: Crane and Grouse http://goo.gl/Unsqy8
- Sandhill Crane breeding: http://goo.gl/9GkgEH
- Lucky Duck saved from frozen pond: http://goo.gl/HClYGP

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